The B1G & SEC Partnership: Merge Into One BIG Conference (Opinion)

March 7, 2024
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The B1G & SEC Partnership: Merge Into One BIG Conference (Opinion)

March 7, 2024
Home » Recent News & Guides » NCAA Football » The B1G & SEC Partnership: Merge Into One BIG Conference (Opinion)
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We strongly believe the B1G and SEC will merge into one big conference, and it could come quicker than we may think. The B1G and SEC partnership is obvious.

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College Football is Changing at a Rapid Rate:

It started as a drip, but now it’s a steady flow, and it will end in a flood. Of course, it will be rebuilt, but it will be rebuilt with money in mind.

We need to think of college football as a forever-evolving machine. It never stops evolving because of its popularity, which will continue to rise.

The bagman usually always shows up when popularity arises. And every time the bagman gets involved it always leads to the same path… More money.

Even if we do not like where the future is headed, there is very little we can do to change that fact. Mankind has a tough time controlling where their money ends up in almost all areas of their life.

We will complain but society rarely ever bands together unless we are in times of war. Much like the conferences didn’t either, and unfortunately, three of them have to pay the price. Past, present, or future, it won’t change that the price is the price.

These are our Reasons as to why the B1G and SEC Will Merge:

1. Contracts Grew

The B1G signed a 7-year deal worth over one billion dollars per year that each of the B1G members will share equally. As with the SEC, they signed a 10-year deal for over $700 million per year.

The CFP will also pay the B1G and SEC more than the other conferences because those two will have more teams in the playoffs. They are the two alpha conferences in college football and nothing can change that.

Simply put, the amount of money the B1G and SEC are making makes their competition non-competitive.

2. What Will Make Even More Money in the Future?

Thinking about the present is easy, but what about the future? Ask yourself, what would make more money than two super conferences? The answer is one super conference. The NFL and USFL could tell you all about it.

That said, the NFL and USFL were competitors of the same sport, much like the B1G and the SEC. The NFL and USFL had the same issues as the B1G and SEC. They split the talent with each other, and they also split the revenue.

Furthermore, the NFL and USFL shared the best high-end players and the B1G and SEC share the best schools. It was an equal situation with different variables. Legends like Steve Young, Jim Kelly, Herschel Walker, and many others played in the USFL.

Both the NFL and USFL at that time were an incomplete package. If combined, the money would come pouring in; that is exactly what happened. The NFL consumed the USFL because they had the edge financially.

They were two sides of the same coin. Once the NFL gained the financial edge over the USFL it only became a matter of time before the USFL collapsed.

3. History Tends to Repeat Itself

The only true difference between the NFL/USFL compared to the B1G/SEC is that the B1G and SEC decided to start working together because they have similar interests.

If one of these two conferences fell it would likely cause a rift between fan basses that they will likely feel the result of financially. Fan bases will rebel, which is bad for business and these conferences know this.

This is the start of where the future is headed. The issue with trying to survive as a group is that there can be no slight edge financially or you will likely lose your top talent.

Replace Jim Kelly and Steve Young with Georgia and Alabama, how long will they be okay with making less than B1G teams?

That being said, as it sits right now the B1G is the richest conference. If the B1G pays its members more per year than the SEC or vice versa, how long until those teams jump ship to the richer conference?

Will Ohio State be okay with making less than Alabama year after year if the SEC makes more? Would Alabama be content with making less than Ohio State year after year if the B1G makes more?

4. Where is the Money Leading Us?

Let’s instead ask ourselves the correct question, how would the TV networks and these two conferences make even more money?

The top four schools in viewership are Ohio State, Michigan, Alabama, and Georgia in that order. These are the four schools that truly changed college. These four drove armies to their TVs, which gave the B1G and SEC the power they needed to consume. They aren’t alone, but they are the leaders of the pack.

Television is a gift of God, and God will hold those who utilize his divine instrument accountable to him. - Philo Farnsworth

The Creator of the television said that. Farnsworth could see the future through his TV screens and it appeared as if he was warning us.

If Ohio State left to make more money, they would bring Michigan and then the B1G would reach its demise. If Alabama left the SEC, Georgia would be on the same plane and then the SEC would be the next Roman Empire. It just takes one of these four to switch sides; it would be curtains for that other conference.

The B1G and SEC are already working together and both would make even more money if the best talent were under one roof. This is what happened to the NFL and USFL, so why would we think it couldn’t happen to college football?

The beautiful part is they do not have to wipe each other out to become richer, they only have to create two conferences under the same league. It appears as if they might have already figured this out.

As history has whispered, money is a path and these companies are usually quite good at finding this path. Whether it’s next year or fifteen years, the talent will be under one roof because it makes too much “cents”.

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